Choosing a Web Package – A Guideline

One of the very first questions you need to ask yourself is: Why do I need a web site? Several answers might pop up; to boost my sales, to make myself known, to have a reference for my clients, to start a new business,…the list can go on and on…but how do you determine what’s right for you and your business?

The way to evaluate possible contenders for the job is to ask the right questions. Here are some questions you cannot afford not to ask.

In reference to the company that provides web services, you should ask…

1. Are they offering just web development, or, just web hosting, or do they have a vast range of services linked to the web industry?…i.e. do they offer the whole spectrum of services linked with web sites?

2. How do their prices compare to other companies who are providing the same services?

3. How flexible are they to my requirements…a) do they offer extra pages? b) do they offer additional hosting? c) is support part of the price I’m paying?

4. Do they offer dynamic sites? Normally this would give an indication of how experienced their programmers are in developing sites.

5. Are there any references to ‘search engine optimization’ on their site? If not, most probably they are not going to write my site in a way that major search engines can find it and rank it highly.

6. Do they offer search engine optimization? This is very important if I need to rank high and make the task for prospective customers to find me an easy one.

These are questions you should ask and if in doubt don’t hesitate to contact the company before investing your money in them. Most importantly they need to have fast and reliable support, although this can only be verified when it’s too late, i.e. you have already paid for it.

Other decisions you need to take is how your web site should look like. Do you require a static site with a lot of content, or minimum content with impressive graphics, sounds and animations? This would obviously depend on the nature of your business and the way you need to promote your image. The company you choose need to have enough experience to help you make this decision based on your business’ perspectives.

Whatever the case, as in nearly all things in life, a moment of reflection and some research are fundamental in order to make the right decision.

How To Find Freelance Work

How many people do you know that don’t have computers or use the Internet? If you are like most, the number is between one and zero. Everyone today is turning towards this resource for information and business in order to find new areas of success. If you are one that is familiar with the Internet, you may also know that getting involved in this virtual community can bring you success!

Where to Find Clients?

After you have gathered together your information, it’s time to find customers! Building your own website will be the best way to advertise your services. It will let others see what you have available and will give several the opportunity of finding you through the Internet. The more websites you build for companies and individuals, the more you will be able to advertise, leaving you with a full time business. Several online freelance job sites have new projects looking for freelancers posted daily.

One of the opportunities that arise with web development is the ability to work on your own time. Usually, one website will take a few days to build, giving you the ability to work at your own pace, and set your own hours. Even with this, you can expect to make an average of $250 – $500 for every individual website, and more for more complicated websites that will need to be made for corporations and companies.

Web development is a business that is needed by other businesses and individuals today. Most that have any type of information or a product that they want to give to the community are working on building a web site. Being computer savvy with the Internet will give you possibilities to help businesses and individuals to profit, as well as your own business.

When you begin to get into web development, you will need to invest in specific things. The first will be the knowledge that you will need in order to develop websites. You will need programs such as Dream Weaver in order to put together the information for a website. If you don’t know how to work with this software, it might be in your best interests to take a class on building websites, or to begin studying the books that will best help you. Depending on the program and class you take, this may cost from $200-$500.

If you enjoy the Internet, why stop with looking at how others are building it? You can be a part of putting together cyber space by creating your own space for building websites. This will help others to advertise their product, and can build profit for you by offering information and products that you find valuable to the web.

What is Web 2.0 – A Definition

Web 2.0 is as yet something of a nebulous term, with as many different definitions out there as people defining it. This naturally can lead to some confusion. O’Reilly Media, an American company who have been one of the leaders in web development book publishing since the internet was in its infancy, came up with the term in a 2003 meeting. Tim O’Reilly and Dale Dougherty, the founders of the company coined the term.

You can find a technical definition of Web 2.0 on Tim O’Reilly’s blog, but most will be left more confused than before upon reading it. O’Reilly has taken this five page definition and put it into (somewhat) simpler language:

“Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantage of that platform; delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an “architecture of participation,” and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.”

The advancements that have been made in computing over the last 25 years are astounding. From DOS to today’s portable devices, Web 2.0 is just another step along the same path; one which promises to make the web a more interactive place and more fun to visit. The transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 can be likened to this – with the web the way it is now, we are like spectators at a football game. In Web 2.0, we will be active participants; as if we were on one of the teams playing the game.

What are the differences between the two? For one, Web 2.0 will look different, with bright colors against white backgrounds, rounded fonts and an all over easy to read format are predicted to become the norm. Arial Rounded and Tahoma will replace Times New Roman and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) will be more heavily used to keep websites more streamlined.

The functionality of Web 2.0 will also be different. MySpace, Twitter and the like are a glimpse at the future, with interaction between user and site being possible. The Web will continue bringing people together to interact and communicate.

Social bookmarking as well as networking will be a big part of Web 2.0. Yahoo Answers is a good example, with people having to ask questions about anything, with users earning points for their answers.

Blogging is something which is often thought of in connection with Web 2.0. Just like a diary, blogging lets people write about anything they like; with the difference being that anyone can now read it. A blog can of course be kept private, but most bloggers prefer to share their thoughts.

The exchange of information between web users overall is a big part of what Web 2.0 is about. Article writing has become a popular activity, with people using them to promote websites or provide information to the public as a whole.

Flickr and YouTube have ushered in an age of picture and video sharing, with interaction possible between poster and viewer.

All this of course is only a hint of things to come. As we see an increasing number of websites moving towards the Web 2.0 standard, there will be uses for the internet which we haven’t even thought of yet. And who knows what Web 3.0 will bring….